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Monday, September 07, 2009

revisiting the woven cloth

felted1
A very productive weekend.Perhaps as it has cooled off a bit i was able to sit at the loom and finish the linen warp. And now with an empty baby i'm planning the next warp for this project , a definite funner and a neat way to put together 2 interests.Did i write neat? Sounds dated doesn't it?

More on putting interests together .i've been pondering for some time now how to incorporate other techniques to the woven cloth .i had to be shaken away from the sacredness of it and the whole process has been like a roller coaster ride.
Me the kamikaze weaver.The same one who shrugs off the rules as long as the cloth holds together...
Along the ride i was confronted with Mags Ramsay and her ways of painting, gessoing, layering and stitching fabric to to suit her creative needs . How has she inadvertently acted as a liberating influence!

So here i am working over this series, this piece in particular is stamped and the stamping highlighted with machine stitching. Then further embellished with needlefelting and some hand stitching. Coincidentally the subject, not the theme, is lily ponds and it is somewhat recurrent as i recall another lily pond from my tapestry weaving days.

All in all i wove 7 small works which will be embellished to different degrees.
The lengths one goes to for creating jacquard wanna be figured cloth :) :)
More about that tomorrow. Or perhaps day after as this week is going to be heavily social.
Be well.

neki desu


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4 comments:

  1. oh i love this. i am sitting here writing an article on the relationship between sewing and weaving. and then i see this. great!

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  2. This is splendid. I loved reading about your process. Now, what is an "empty baby"? A loom?

    P.S. I yearn for a return to productivity!!!

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  3. kamikaze weaver! gotta love it.

    just been working on my upcoming lecture and refer to the "kamikaze winds"- and how the Japanese designated them "divine protectors" of Japan when typhoon-force winds staved off invaders on several occasions in the 13th century allowing for the protection of both Japan's people and their culture.

    i see what you are doing here as a preservation of sorts- definitely kamikaze style!

    new project looks interesting

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interaction appreciated!

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